Viewpoints

No One Has the Inherent Right to Enrich: A Rebuttal

Author: Nader Bagherzadeh October 12, 2013

According to Wendy Sherman who is the U.S. negotiator for the P5+1 group, on October 3rd at a Senate Foreign Relations Committee hearing on Iran said that “… no country has the inherent right to enrich uranium.” Her position is that Article IV of Nonproliferation Treaty (NPT) does not spell out enrichment specifically at all, and she does have a point, if one reviews this Article as it is written, but her conclusion is wrong. ››read more


Who should Lead Iran’s New Nuclear Team?

Author: Nader Bagherzadeh July 26, 2013

The first and most important decision Rohani, the newly elected Iranian president, has to make is to select a capable and competent nuclear team for future discussions with P5+1. Resolving the nuclear issue will overshadow everything else that Rohani has to accomplish in the first year of his presidency. Draconian sanctions have derailed Iran’s economy far beyond any criticism one could blame on Ahmadinejad’s domestic economic policies mismanagement. According to Suri, the former manager of the South Pars project in the Persian Gulf, several phases of this gigantic natural gas facility have been delayed directly because of sanctions that have impacted acquisition of technology and equipment. ››read more


Can Iran Live with a Mickey Mouse Enrichment Program?

Author: Nader Bagherzadeh June 29, 2013

There are indications by at least one recent article [1] written by Dennis Ross, a Washington insider for
many years, that Obama with tacit support of Israel may agree to some level of enrichment in Iran.
Provided the “break out” period is very long, perhaps in terms of months or even years but not days.
Break out period is usually defined as the amount of time it takes for a country to enrich enough bomb
grade nuclear material for at least one crude nuclear weapon, after IAEA inspectors and their equipment
have been kicked out of the country. Two factors control the break out period: ››read more


Review of "Under the Western Eyes: Feminist Scholarship and Colonial Discourses"

Author: Monireh Mohammadi January 3, 2013

In Under the Western Eyes, Chandra Talpade Mohanty criticizes homogeneous perspectives and presuppositions in some of the Western feminist texts that focus on women in the third world. More specifically, the author anchors her accounts of Western feminism in a select group of texts produced by Fran Hosken, Maria Cutrufelli, Juliette Minces, Beverly Lindsay, and Patricia Jeffery published by Zed Press in what is entitled the Third World Series. According to Mohanty, these writers draw attention to the codification of scholarly writings that discursively colonize and ghettoize non-Western, “Third World” women as the collective Other. She argues that the universal categorization of a large group of women in non-Western countries is mostly done through constructed monolithic terms and classifications. ››read more


Review of "Under the Western Eyes: Feminist Scholarship and Colonial Discourses"

Author: Monireh Mohammadi January 3, 2013

In Under the Western Eyes, Chandra Talpade Mohanty criticizes homogeneous perspectives and presuppositions in some of the Western feminist texts that focus on women in the third world. More specifically, the author anchors her accounts of Western feminism in a select group of texts produced by Fran Hosken, Maria Cutrufelli, Juliette Minces, Beverly Lindsay, and Patricia Jeffery published by Zed Press in what is entitled the Third World Series. According to Mohanty, these writers draw attention to the codification of scholarly writings that discursively colonize and ghettoize non-Western, “Third World” women as the collective Other. She argues that the universal categorization of a large group of women in non-Western countries is mostly done through constructed monolithic terms and classifications. ››read more


A Response to Raha/Havaar's 'Open Letter' Attack on the Anti-Imperialist Left

Author: Phil Wilayto (source: Counterpunch) October 4, 2012

It's late September 2012, and tensions between Iran and the Western powers have seldom been more intense. The Democratic and Republican presidential candidates are desperately trying to outdo each other in militaristic rhetoric against the Islamic Republic. The latest in a long series of U.S., European and U.N. sanctions are threatening Iran's ability to sell oil – by far its major revenue-generating export – in the world market. The U.S. Navy's 5th Fleet is leading a threatening 30-nation naval exercise in the Persian Gulf. Canada, without any apparent provocation, has expelled all Iranian diplomats and closed its embassy in Tehran. Responding to a multi-million dollar public relations campaign, the U.S. State Department is removing the “terrorist” designation from the anti-Iranian political/military organization Mujahadeen-e-Khalq, or MKO. And Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu is threatening to attack Iran, with or without Washington's permission. ››read more


Iranian threat - Pretext for US global dominance?

Author: Soraya Sepahpour-Ulrich (source: RT) August 10, 2012

Amid growing tensions with Iran, the US is piecing together a missile defense system across the Persian Gulf. However, writer Soraya Sepahpour-Ulrich believes the US is using Iran as an excuse in its push for global dominance. ››read more


War on Iran would have disastrous consequences that would destabilize everything

Author: Arshin Adib-Moghaddam (source: News.Az) August 9, 2012

News.Az interviews Arshin Adib-Moghaddam, Reader in Comparative Politics and International Relations at the prestigious SOAS, University of London. ››read more


An Iranian optic on the Middle East and its prospects

Author: Seyed Mohammad Marandi (source: Conflicts forum) January 7, 2012

Almost a year ago, in a well-remembered Friday prayer sermon delivered on February 4, 2011, Ayatollah Khamenei spoke at length, in Arabic, about the uprisings in Tunisia and Egypt. At the time, the Egyptian people were on the streets attempting to topple the Western-backed dictator, Hosni Mubarak. In his sermon, after praising the Tunisian people, Ayatollah Khamenei spoke of how Mubarak had humiliated Egypt by becoming an American pawn and an ally of Israel. He also recalled the sharp pain that Egyptians felt when Mubarak helped implement the Western-imposed, inhuman siege of Gaza and when his regime worked in partnership with Israel and the United States during the 22-day onslaught against women, men, and children there in late 2008. ››read more


WHY THE MYTH OF IRAN’S “STOLEN” ELECTION STILL MATTERS

Author: Flynt Leverett and Hillary Mann Leverett (source: Race for Iran) September 7, 2011

The Arab awakening has revived Western speculation about “what could have been” in the Islamic Republic of Iran if only the United States had provided more tangible support for Mir Hussein Mousavi and the Green Movement in the wake of Iran’s June 12, 2009 presidential election. Central to that speculation is an account of Iran’s election as one of the great frauds in modern political history. This account has been promulgated by agenda-driven Iran “experts” in the West, expatriate Iranians with an animus against the Islamic Republic, and major media outlets. Some of us have gone to considerable lengths to point out that the narrative does not have a single piece of hard evidence supporting it. But the myth of Iran’s “stolen” election maintains its hold over a significant percentage of American and other Western elites. ››read more


Washington's Favorite Terrorists: Mujahedin-e Khalq (MKO, MEK, PMOI)

Author: NIACouncil (source: NIAC) July 13, 2011

MEK is on the verge of getting off the U.S. list of terrorist organizations as a result of a multi-million dollar media & lobbying blitz. http://mekterror.com ››read more


Iran-Saudi Relations: Time for Active Diplomacy

Author: Kayhan Barzegar (inteviewed) (source: Iran Review) July 13, 2011

What follows is an interview conducted by Mosallas (Triangle) magazine with Kayhan Barzegar, Director of the Institute for Middle East Strategic Studies and a faculty member at the Science and Research Branch of the Islamic Azad University in Tehran. ››read more


Iranian 'feud': Much ado about nothing?

Author: Sharmine Narwani (source: Aljazeera) May 16, 2011

A public spat between Iran's Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei and the country's president Mahmoud Ahmadinejad made the international headlines last week. Politics is rarely ever a harmonious business in any country, so why the brouhaha over this particular stand-off? ››read more


LIBYA, IRAN, AND THE OBAMA DOCTRINE OF (SELECTIVE) PREVENTIVE “HUMANITARIAN” INTERVENTION

Author: Flynt Leverett and Hillary Mann Leverett (source: Race for Iran) April 18, 2011

The explanations offered by the President and senior members of his Administration for this decision have been (to be generous) strategically incoherent. Looking behind the presidential speeches and talking points, we would identify three distinct arguments for the Libya intervention, each championed by a different faction within the Obama Administration. Each of these arguments has Iran-related dimensions.

One is the “liberal imperialist” argument (to borrow John Mearsheimer’s
››read more


Middle East: “No state or political movement will remain unaffected”

Author: Arshin Adib-Moghaddam interviewed by James Chapple (source: The Fresh Outlook) April 1, 2011

Dr. Adib-MoghaddamDr. Adib-MoghaddamTo try to contextualise the ever-changing situation in the region, The Fresh Outlook’s Editorial Assistant, James Chapple, contacted Dr Arshin Adib-Moghaddam, an expert in Middle Eastern politics at the University of London’s School of Oriental and African Studies. His book, ‘A Metahistory of the Clash of Civilisations: Us and Them Beyond Orientalism’, explores the clash between eastern and western ideologies, a central theme permeating developments since the start of the year. ››read more


Exposed: The US-Saudi Libya deal

Author: Pepe Escobar (source: Asia Times) April 3, 2011

Pepe EscobarPepe Escobar

You invade Bahrain. We take out Muammar Gaddafi in Libya. This, in short, is the essence of a deal struck between the Barack Obama administration and the House of Saud. Two diplomatic sources at the United Nations independently confirmed that Washington, via Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, gave the go-ahead for Saudi Arabia to invade Bahrain and crush the pro-democracy movement in their neighbor in exchange for a "yes" ››read more


U.S. bombing works against, not toward, a democratic Libya

Author: Ian Harris (source: Madison.com) April 2, 2011

People should not be surprised that the United States has put itself in line to dictate the nature of the next head of state in Libya. After all, in 1954 this country replaced an elected leader in Iran, Mohammad Mossadegh, who had promised to nationalize the oil in his country. Look what happened to Saddam Hussein after he nationalized the oil in Iraq! In 2009 Moammar Gadhafi mentioned nationalizing the oil industry in Libya, where the largest oil company was already state owned. This made Gadhafi a dangerous mad dog renegade who needed to be replaced. Do you see a pattern here? ››read more


Obama's Doctrine of Preemptive War

Author: Matt Welch (source: reason.com) March 29, 2011

Anyone who was expecting the "anti-war" presidential candidate Barack Obama to be anything like an anti-war president was simply not paying sufficient attention to how he campaigned. It wasn't just the daily vows to escalate in Afghanistan, or the repeated promises to act "unilaterally" if need be. It was, as then-Reason Associate Editor David Weigel reported in 2008, that "he has called for, or retroactively endorsed, interventions in Zimbabwe, Pakistan, and Sudan." ››read more


Empire's new "democratic" plan for the Middle East

Author: Behzad Majdian (source: Intifada Palestine) March 18, 2011

If you have an uneasy feeling that there is something suspicious about the overthrow of Mubarak in Egypt, you are not alone. The dictator has been ousted; yet the dictatorship structure remains intact. And presumably, it is in the process of preparing the ground for bringing “democracy” to Egypt. ››read more


If intervention in Libya is good, why was intervention in Iraq bad?

Author: Damian Lataan (source: Lataan Weblog) March 20, 2011

The simple answer is this; ‘intervention’ in Iraq was for all the wrong reasons while intervention in Libya is for all the right reasons. I know that sounds a bit self-righteous, but please read on because the full answer is nowhere near as simple. ››read more